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Welcome to the "Encyclopedia of World Subcultures"!

Besides the fact that each of you can edit this encyclopedia, this resource is an official mass media and an official partner of the "Extended Ukrainian Encyclopedia". The project is a multilingual one, it is currently supported in Ukrainian, Russian and English.
Currently there are 155 articles in English language in the "Encyclopedia of World Subcultures".

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Goth subculture

Gothic girl.jpg

The goth subculture is a youth subculture that began in England during the early 1980s where it developed from the audience of gothic rock, an offshoot of the post-punk genre. Seminal post-punk and gothic rock artists that helped develop and shape the subculture include Siouxsie and the Banshees, The Cure, Joy Division, and Bauhaus. The goth subculture, whose name derived directly from the music genre, has survived much longer than others of the same era, and has continued to diversify and spread throughout the world. Its imagery and cultural proclivities indicate influences from the 19th century Gothic literature and gothic horror films. The scene is centered on music festivals, nightclubs and organized meetings, especially in Western Europe.

The goth subculture has associated tastes in music, aesthetics, and fashion. The music preferred by the goth subculture includes a number of different styles, e.g. gothic rock, death rock, post-punk, new wave, dark wave lil peep (e.g. ethereal wave and neoclassical), and dark ambient/industrial. Styles of dress within the subculture draw on punk, new wave and new romantic fashion as well as fashion of earlier periods such as the Victorian and Edwardian eras (Belle Époque), or combinations of the above, usually with dark attire (often black), pale face makeup and black hair. The subculture continues to draw interest from a large audience decades after its emergence. Read more

La Sape

Men's Sapeur inspired looks from SS 15 lookbook.jpg
La Sape, an abbreviation based on the phrase Société des Ambianceurs et des Personnes Élégantes (French; literally "Society of Ambiance-Makers and Elegant People") and hinting to the French slang word sape which means "attire", is a subculture centered on the cities of Kinshasa and Brazzaville in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Republic of Congo respectively. An adherent of La Sape is known as a sapeur. The movement embodies the elegance in style and manners of colonial predecessor dandies.Read more

Picture of the week

Subculcheres.jpg

Did you know?

  • Heavy metal fans go by a number of different names, including metalhead, headbanger, hesher, mosher and heavy, with the term thrasher being used only for fans of thrash metal music, which began to differentiate itself from other varieties of metal in the late 80's.
  • LGBT movements have often adopted a kind of identity politics that sees gay, bisexual and transgender people as a fixed class of people; a minority group or groups, and this is very common among LGBT communities.
  • The term "new lad" was coined by journalist Sean O'Hagan in a 1993 article about a young, brash and boisterous economist called David "Lad Lad Lad" Sturrock in Arena.
  • Military bases are often small cities with 10,000 or more people, and are self-contained worlds where military culture is primary and civilian culture is secondary.
  • The greaser subculture may have emerged in the post-World War II era among the motorcycle clubs and gangs of the late 1940s, though it was certainly established by the 1950s.
  • Quite a few of the Hamburg fans of The Beatles, in the period 1960–62, regarded themselves as "Exis".
  • Hardliners (as they are called) are expected to follow a strict dietary regimen based on the above-mentioned pillars of respect for innocent life and the "natural order".
  • Since the boundaries of cyberculture are difficult to define, the term is used flexibly, and its application to specific circumstances can be controversial.

Hippie

Young people near the Woodstock festival in August 1969
A hippie (sometimes spelled hippy) is a member of a counterculture, originally a youth movement that began in the United States during the mid-1960s and spread to other countries around the world. The word hippie came from hipster and used to describe beatniks who moved into New York City's Greenwich Village and San Francisco's Haight-Ashbury district. The term hippie first found popularity in San Francisco by Herb Caen, a journalist for the San Francisco Chronicle. The origins of the terms hip and hep are uncertain. By the 1940s, both had become part of African American jive slang and meant "sophisticated; currently fashionable; fully up-to-date".<ref>To say "I'm hip to the situation" means "I'm aware of the situation.Read more

Cybergoth

Portrait of a 31-year old woman dressed in a cyberpunk industrial outfit, photographed in 2013.jpg

Cybergoth is a subculture that derives from elements of goth, raver, and rivethead fashion. Unlike traditional goths, Cybergoths primarily listen to electronic music more often than rock music.

The term 'Cybergoth' was coined in 1988 in Berlin, Germany by Games Workshop, for their roleplaying game Dark Future, the fashion style did not emerge until a decade later. Valerie Steele quotes Julia Borden, who defines cybergoth as combining elements of industrial aesthetics with a style associated with "Gravers" (Gothic ravers).Read more

Goth subculture

Gothic girl.jpg

The goth subculture is a youth subculture that began in England during the early 1980s where it developed from the audience of gothic rock, an offshoot of the post-punk genre. Seminal post-punk and gothic rock artists that helped develop and shape the subculture include Siouxsie and the Banshees, The Cure, Joy Division, and Bauhaus. The goth subculture, whose name derived directly from the music genre, has survived much longer than others of the same era, and has continued to diversify and spread throughout the world. Its imagery and cultural proclivities indicate influences from the 19th century Gothic literature and gothic horror films. The scene is centered on music festivals, nightclubs and organized meetings, especially in Western Europe.

The goth subculture has associated tastes in music, aesthetics, and fashion. The music preferred by the goth subculture includes a number of different styles, e.g. gothic rock, death rock, post-punk, new wave, dark wave lil peep (e.g. ethereal wave and neoclassical), and dark ambient/industrial. Styles of dress within the subculture draw on punk, new wave and new romantic fashion as well as fashion of earlier periods such as the Victorian and Edwardian eras (Belle Époque), or combinations of the above, usually with dark attire (often black), pale face makeup and black hair. The subculture continues to draw interest from a large audience decades after its emergence. Read more

La Sape

Men's Sapeur inspired looks from SS 15 lookbook.jpg
La Sape, an abbreviation based on the phrase Société des Ambianceurs et des Personnes Élégantes (French; literally "Society of Ambiance-Makers and Elegant People") and hinting to the French slang word sape which means "attire", is a subculture centered on the cities of Kinshasa and Brazzaville in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Republic of Congo respectively. An adherent of La Sape is known as a sapeur. The movement embodies the elegance in style and manners of colonial predecessor dandies.Read more

Did you know?

  • Heavy metal fans go by a number of different names, including metalhead, headbanger, hesher, mosher and heavy, with the term thrasher being used only for fans of thrash metal music, which began to differentiate itself from other varieties of metal in the late 80's.
  • LGBT movements have often adopted a kind of identity politics that sees gay, bisexual and transgender people as a fixed class of people; a minority group or groups, and this is very common among LGBT communities.
  • The term "new lad" was coined by journalist Sean O'Hagan in a 1993 article about a young, brash and boisterous economist called David "Lad Lad Lad" Sturrock in Arena.
  • Military bases are often small cities with 10,000 or more people, and are self-contained worlds where military culture is primary and civilian culture is secondary.
  • The greaser subculture may have emerged in the post-World War II era among the motorcycle clubs and gangs of the late 1940s, though it was certainly established by the 1950s.
  • Quite a few of the Hamburg fans of The Beatles, in the period 1960–62, regarded themselves as "Exis".
  • Hardliners (as they are called) are expected to follow a strict dietary regimen based on the above-mentioned pillars of respect for innocent life and the "natural order".
  • Since the boundaries of cyberculture are difficult to define, the term is used flexibly, and its application to specific circumstances can be controversial.

Hippie

Young people near the Woodstock festival in August 1969
A hippie (sometimes spelled hippy) is a member of a counterculture, originally a youth movement that began in the United States during the mid-1960s and spread to other countries around the world. The word hippie came from hipster and used to describe beatniks who moved into New York City's Greenwich Village and San Francisco's Haight-Ashbury district. The term hippie first found popularity in San Francisco by Herb Caen, a journalist for the San Francisco Chronicle. The origins of the terms hip and hep are uncertain. By the 1940s, both had become part of African American jive slang and meant "sophisticated; currently fashionable; fully up-to-date".<ref>To say "I'm hip to the situation" means "I'm aware of the situation.Read more

Cybergoth

Portrait of a 31-year old woman dressed in a cyberpunk industrial outfit, photographed in 2013.jpg

Cybergoth is a subculture that derives from elements of goth, raver, and rivethead fashion. Unlike traditional goths, Cybergoths primarily listen to electronic music more often than rock music.

The term 'Cybergoth' was coined in 1988 in Berlin, Germany by Games Workshop, for their roleplaying game Dark Future, the fashion style did not emerge until a decade later. Valerie Steele quotes Julia Borden, who defines cybergoth as combining elements of industrial aesthetics with a style associated with "Gravers" (Gothic ravers).Read more